About Garvin

 

Garvin had his heart set on changing the world.  We think he managed to do that. Rest in peace Garvin. You will be very much missed <3

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Garvin was born in New Zealand the year 1928 and in his 20’s moved to Australia.  He first lived in Brisbane (Qld) and raised a family there before moving to the Gold Coast and opening an accounting practice.  Always known as the unconventional accountant, it wasn’t unusual for him to be seen looking quite the professional sitting at his desk, with his unseen half sporting board-shorts and thongs.  His clients were considered friends and came to Garvin for all sorts of advice, never leaving without having had a good old chat.  You may be surprised to hear Garvin is actually a man a few words, though he has open ears and a caring heart.

Sport came naturally to Garvin and his younger days in New Zealand saw him busily involved in weight lifting and athletics.  In Australia he took up surfing and got back into pole vaulting and just about every event going at the Masters Athletics.  Being not at all interested in the limelight he would probably not want me to tell you he won a world championship gold medal for the decathlon at the World Masters Games in 2001 … but being an admirer of Garvin’s I feel I’m allowed to boast about how talented he is.

It was when he was about the young age of 75 that Garvin retired.  His long held interest in Gandhi was reignited when he read about the 75th anniversary of the Gandhi Salt March being held in India in 2005.  He had soon booked his trip to India to join the Salt March and a new chapter in his life had begun.

It was during this trip that Garvin met some of the people that would influence his life so greatly …
Uttam Teron – Uttam runs Parijat Academy in Assam which is a school that provides education and care for underprivileged children throughout Assam.  Established in 2003 starting with just 4 children in a small room it has grown to a school of about 500 students. It is a non religious and non profitable school providing free education.

Over the next few years Garvin traveled three times more to India, each time he held the belief that if he could just make the world would sit up and take notice, then change would begin for the woman and children he cares for so much.  Sewing machines and looms for the women to be able to bring money into their homes and support their children.  Computers into classrooms so the children could have access to a wider education and the world outside of their villages.  Such simple needs that would make such major changes … surely this would be an easy task?

Well the Indian media certainly sat up and took notice … the scramble to get a microphone in front of Garvin to hear him speak at rallys and events was amazing.  Sadly though, the rest of the world media had little interest in an old man from Australia who wanted to change the world … and attempts by family back home to raise interest were all met with a wall of silence.

The year is 2013 and along comes the age of the blog and amazing new technology!  Now Garvin could access the world without the help of traditional media.

In September 2013 when Garvin touched down in Dehli with his daughter Lissa and grandsons Tommis and Vincent, he stayed among the people who live in poverty that we always hear about.  The people who are the nameless and faceless ‘third world country’ dwellers, who’s voices are never heard and who seem to disappear amongst the facts and figures of the tragedy.

Garvin wanted you to come on this trip with him and his family to feel as if you were in India with him … laughing with the locals, sharing their joy and feeling their pain.  Garvin listened to their stories and wanted to tell them to the world … and he needs YOU to hear their stories.

Once we all see these people as human beings … just like ourselves and not nameless numbers … it will start to bring about CHANGE TO GOVERNMENTS, TO RELIGIONS, TO THE WORLD!

 Posted by at 1:36 pm

  14 Responses to “About Garvin”

  1. this is so nice informative website.

  2. All the best Garvin . You will certainly reach your goal

  3. Indeed a lovely work.. It would be more nice to see it updated on regular intervals with new content being added. Thank you. Regards. Dhaval. India

  4. If our lives could lie before us,
    like a straight and narrow highway,
    we would never look to heaven,
    make a wish or climb a mountain,
    because we’d always know the answer,
    and what’s on the other side.
    But life’s not an easy freeway,
    just some gravel on the ground,
    and we pay for every mile we go,
    and we spread some dust around.
    Not sure whose words they are Garvin – they are just sprang to mind reading this.
    When you walk, you walk with many friends, in spirit and in soul.
    Whether your road is straight and narrow,
    or whether its twisted and steep,
    your footprints are a legacy.

  5. We are all proud of what you are working so hard to make happen. You are an inspiration! You have my love and support in your goals.

  6. thanks, and keep up the good work

  7. We are a group of volunteers and starting a new scheme in our community. Your site offered us with valuable information to work on. You’ve done an impressive job and our entire community will be grateful to you.

    • Tyree thank you for your comment. I would be interested to hear of your New Scheme. The prime need is to be persistent and never give up.

      Sincerely

      Garvin
      Mahatma Gandhi Awareness

  8. Sensational info. I look forward to seeing much more.

  9. Excellent blog post, I look forward to reading much more.

  10. I’ll miss you Garvin… rest in peace, give mum a big hug and say ‘hi’ to Gandhi for me
    <3

  11. I’ll miss you Daddle. Thank you for all of the advice and guidance you’ve given me throughout my life. You’re at peace now in a much better place. We love you x

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